2014 School Field Trips

2014 Nebraska Standards-Based Field Trips

**Please Note**

Schools must schedule a field trip at least two weeks in advance.  The minimum number of students required is 20 and the maximum is 120 per field trip.

Science

Grades
Standard
Strategic Air & Space Connection
Please note: Field trips may also contain any of the following experiences determined by the Education Coordinator and approved by the teacher:Demonstrations, Scavenger Hunts, Exploratory time in the Hangars, time in traveling exhibits, Planetarium, etc.
K-2ndNE 2.3.1b Identify the basic needs of living things: food, water, air, space, shelterPlanning and Serving Food in Space
*see workshop description below
3rd-5thNE 5.4.1a Recognize that the observed shape of the Moon changes from day to day during a one month periodPhases of the Moon Wheel
*see workshop description below
6th -8thNE 8.4.1.c Describe the effects of gravity on Earth and the effect of gravity on objects in the solar system.Free Falling
*see workshop description below
9th-12th NE 12.4.1.c Describe stellar evolution. Star Cycle Balloons
*see workshop description below

Social Studies

Grades
Standard
Strategic Air & Space Connection
Please note: Field trips may also contain any of the following experiences determined by the Education Coordinator and approved by the teacher:Demonstrations, Scavenger Hunts, Exploratory time in the Hangars, time in traveling exhibits, Planetarium, etc.
K-2ndNE 2.3.5 Students will identify the relationship between humans and the physical environmentCrew Assembly Training
*see workshop description below
3rd - 5thNE 3.4.2.a Describe the role of historical people, events, ideas, and symbols, including various cultures and ethnic groups (e.g., local cultural figures, landmarks, celebrations, and cultural events)Clay Anderson Tribute
*see workshop description below
6th-8thNE 8.4.4.d Identify and analyze multiple causes and effects upon key events in US historyThe Great Space Race
*see workshop description below
9th-12th NE 12.4.2 Students will analyze and evaluate the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols upon US history using multiple types of sources.Moon Landing
*see workshop description below

Please note: Field trips may also contain any of the following experiences determined by the Education Coordinator and approved by the teacher:Demonstrations, Scavenger Hunts, Exploratory time in the Hangars, time in the traveling exhibits, Planetarium, etc.

Field Trip Package Options

K-2nd1 ½ hours
9:00-10:30,
10:30-12:00
$6.00
Half Day (3 hours)
9:00-12:00,
10:00-1:00
$7.00
Full Day (5 hours)
9:00-2:00
10:00-3:00
$8.00
3rd -5th1 ½ hours
9:00-10:30,
10:30-12:00
$6.00
Half Day (3 hours)
9:00-12:00,
10:00-1:00
$7.00
Full Day (5 hours)
9:00-2:00
10:00-3:00
$8.00
6th-8th1 ½ hours
9:00-10:30,
10:30-12:00
$6.00
Half Day (3 hours)
9:00-12:00,
10:00-1:00
$7.00
Full Day (5 hours)
9:00-2:00
10:00-3:00
$8.00
9th-12th1 ½ hours
9:00-10:30,
10:30-12:00
$6.00
Half Day (3 hours)
9:00-12:00,
10:00-1:00
$7.00
Full Day (5 hours)
9:00-2:00
10:00-3:00
$8.00

 

Descriptions of Nebraska State Standards Based Field Trips

K-2

Social Studies:

Crew Assembly Training: Astronauts wear special gloves to protect their hands from the harsh environment of space. Because these gloves provide such important protection, they are pretty bulky and inflexible. Train like the astronauts do in this activity where concentration and dexterity are challenged when you become the astronaut and are challenged to piece together a puzzle while wearing “astronaut” gloves. This activity addresses Social Studies Standard 2.3.5 (Students will identify the relationship between humans and the physical environment)

Science:

Planning and Serving Food in Space: Astronauts use special trays in space because of the special microgravity environment. If they didn’t attach their food to the tray and the tray to either themselves or the wall, their food would float away! In this activity, students design their own space tray designed to keep food from escaping, while also learning about healthy food options to keep the astronauts performing at their peak potential. This activity addresses NE Science Standard 2.3.1b. (Identify the basic needs of living things: food, water, air, space, shelter)

3-5

Social Studies:

Clay Anderson Tribute: Come to the Strategic Air and Space museum and learn about where it all started! Nebraska’s very own astronaut and Ashland, NE’s hometown hero is highlighted in this field trip experience. Students will have a “blast” learning facts about Clay’s life. In addition, students will design their very own mission patch highlighting the adventure that is their life. Looking at examples of previous mission patches including Clay Anderson’s patches from his missions in space, students will be inspired to create and design a mission patch specific to their goals and interests to proudly represent themselves. This activity addresses NE Social Studies Standard 3.4.2.a (Describe the role of historical people, events, ideas, and symbols, including various cultures and ethnic groups (e.g., local cultural figures, landmarks, celebrations, and cultural events)

Science:

Phases of the Moon Wheel: The phases of the moon are such an intriguing concept and can be very hard for students to grasp. Students will first be introduced to the moon phases by a demonstration, followed by a hands-on activity where students will create a visual representation of the moon phases to take away with them. This would make a great classroom bulletin board display or memento for parents. This activity addresses NE Science Standard 5.4.1a (Recognize that the observed shape of the Moon changes from day to day during a one month period)

6-8

Social Studies:

The Great Space Race: Sputnik and the dawn of the Cold War are integral historical components to the development of SAC and the aircraft found in our collection at the Strategic Air and Space Museum. Sputnik is well known in space history, but the story that is not as retold is how America responded to the Russian challenge with our own satellite, Explorer One. Following a discussion of these events, students will create and construct their very own satellite out of recycled materials, determining what is important to the function of the satellite without going over budget or weight! This activity addresses NE Social Studies Standard 8.4.4.d (Identify and analyze multiple causes and effects upon key events in US history)

Science:

Free Falling:  A common misconception students may have about space is that there is zero gravity out there, and this is why astronauts experience “weightlessness”. However, if this were true, the sun and the moon would fall right out of the sky! Following a demonstration, students will work on an experiment that seeks to address this misconception, focusing on explaining gravity on Earth, Earth’s gravitational pull, and microgravity in space flight. This activity addresses NE Science Standard 8.4.1.c (Describe the effects of gravity on Earth and the effect of gravity on objects in the solar system).

9-12

Social Studies:

Moon Landing: Students will relive the historic moon landing and discuss the implications of such a huge achievement on history. As such an impactful event of the 20th century, students should be prepared to discuss this momentous event. Following this discussion, students will participate in an activity to calculate distance to the moon from the Earth. This activity reinforces the idea of just how much time and distance went into the original Apollo mission to the moon. Students will calculate the distances and times using data from NASA. This activity addresses NE Social Studies Standard 12.4.2 (Students will analyze and evaluate the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols upon US history using multiple types of sources).

Science:

Star Cycle Balloons: Understanding the life cycle of a star can be a very complicated task but not in this engaging, hands-on activity. Students will be given different task cards and a balloon to represent red stars, yellow stars, white stars, and blue stars. Following the instructions on the task cards as a group, the students will be able to see stars dying out as others are born while other stars “pop” and planetary nebula “confetti” bursts out. This activity addresses Science Standard 12.4.1.c (Describe stellar evolution).

Staying for lunch?

Students are welcome to eat their Brown Bag lunch at our cafeteria located under the massive wingspan of the B-36 in Hangar A. Please indicate that you are staying for lunch on the online registration form.